top of page
Search
  • James McPartland

In every situation, take 100% for your part...

"As leaders, we must be resolute in our willingness to take 100% responsibility for our part in any problem. There's no one else to blame when you're at the top." -James McPartland


Access Point: Courageous Conversations | Blog post by James McPartland | Speaker, Author, Executive Coach

If you've got a conflict you need to resolve -- I've got a clear method for you to execute as your best next step: Take 100% for your 50%.


That equation might look a little different for you depending on the circumstance - but the principle still applies: Take full responsibility for your part of the conflict.


It's easy to find the blame in others- especially when there appears to be a clear fault. But in every exchange, there was participation on both sides of the street. Being willing to thoroughly evaluate your part takes practice, and taking 100% of your 50% is a highly effective strategy when you're looking to level up your communication game.


So once you're done venting about the other guy, slow down and honestly answer these questions:

👉 Did I have an expectation that I failed to communicate clearly?

👉 Was I holding anything back during that exchange?

👉 Did I have any selfish motives, or a blind lack of regard for others?

👉 Did I consider what was important to them?

👉 Is there something I was pretending not to know?


If anything comes up, and it likely will, you've got a part to own. Even if you think it’s 10% and that they're 90% responsible -- you still have positive action you can take to get the conversation going again.


Go to that person and take ownership. Focus on your part, making no mention of theirs. This is your opportunity to build 100% of your 50% of the bridge and meet them halfway.


Now I'm not saying there's a guarantee as to the outcome going the way you hope it does. Others have a choice in how they respond, and that's not on you.


But without having a conversation, you don't even have a chance!


So try that, and follow my weekly emails for more tips in this No Straight Lines series. I promise to make it worth your time.


Mac 😎


Comments


Red & dark gray.png
bottom of page